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> Perfectly Safe To Remove Files And Folders
Bold_Fortune
post Aug 21 2008, 02:57 PM
Post #1


Trying To Think Of Something Cute To Say Here
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Perfectly Safe To Remove Files and Folders


Cleaning Up After Microsoft Updates

C:\WINDOWS\$hf_mig$
I delete the $hf_mig$ folder and its contents.

Per Microsoft: When a security update, critical update, update, update rollup, driver, or feature pack installs GDR (General Distribution Releases) version files, the hotfix files are also copied to the %windir%\$hf_mig$ folder. This supports migration to the appropriate files if you later install a hotfix or service pack that includes earlier versions of these files. For example, consider the following scenario:

1. You apply a security update that installs a GDR version of File.dll with a version number of 5.2.3790.1000 and copies a hotfix version of File.dll with a version number of 5.2.3790.1000 to the %windir%\$hf_mig$ folder.

2. You apply a hotfix that includes a hotfix version of File.dll with a version number of 5.2.3790.0000.
In this scenario the hotfix installation in step 2 installs the hotfix version of File.dll (version number 5.2.3790.1000) from the %windir%\$hf_mig$ folder instead of the hotfix version of File.dll (version number 5.2.3790.0000) from the hotfix package.

C:\WINDOWS\$MSI31Uninstall_KB893803v2$
I delete the $NtServicePackUninstallIDNMitigationAPIs$ folder and its contents.

Windows Installer 3.1 uninstall files.

The Microsoft Windows Installer 3.1 is the application installation and configuration service for Windows.

C:\WINDOWS\$NtServicePackUninstallIDNMitigationAPIs$ and C:\WINDOWS\$NtServicePackUninstallNLSDownlevelMapping$ (Installed by Internet Explorer 7.)

I delete both these folders and their contents.

These folders each contain necessary files for the uninstallation of Internet Explorer 7. You can uninstall IE7 through the Add/Remove Programs window, but these folders and their contents must be present in order to do so.

These folders and their contents have absolutely nothing to do with Internet Explorer 7 being in good working order. If you are certain you won't need to uninstall IE7, then by all means, delete these folders and their contents.

C:\WINDOWS\$NtUninstallKBxxxxxx$
I delete all the $NtUninstallKBxxxxxx$ folders and their contents.

These $NtUninstallKBxxxxxx$ folders contain the uninstall files for the Windows Updates.

They have nothing to do with the Updates being in good working order on your system. If you are certain that you won't need to uninstall any of these Updates, by all means, delete these folders.

C:\WINDOWS\ie7 (Installed by Internet Explorer 7.)
I delete the ie7 folder and its contents.

The ie7 folder contains the necessary files for uninstalling of Internet Explorer 7. You can uninstall IE7 through the Add/Remove Programs window, but the ie7 folder and its contents must be present in order to do so.

This folder and its contents has absolutely nothing to do with Internet Explorer 7 being in good working order. If you are certain you won't need to uninstall IE7, then by all means delete the ie7 folder and its contents.

C:\WINDOWS\ie7updates (Installed by Internet Explorer 7.)
I delete the ie7 folder and its contents.

The ie7updates folder contains the files Microsoft downloads to your system to be able to then draw upon during the IE7 installation.

C:\WINDOWS\ie8 (Installed by Internet Explorer 8.)
I delete the ie8 folder and its contents.

The ie8 folder contains the necessary files for uninstalling Internet Explorer 8. You can uninstall IE8 through the Add/Remove Programs window, but the ie8 folder and its contents must be present in order to do so.

This folder and its contents has absolutely nothing to do with Internet Explorer 8 being in good working order. If you are certain you won't need to uninstall IE8, then by all means delete the ie8 folder and its contents.

C:\WINDOWS\inf

The *.PNF Files in the inf folder.

Per Rob Elder: "It's a "pre-compiled" version of the ASCII .INF file that gets created when the Setup first processes a particular .INF file. It's done to speed up searches of the .INF files (as you've noticed there are LOTS of those on the system in Windows 2000/XP); if the dates of the .INF and .PNF files compare favorably (.PNF is later than .INF) the corresponding .PNF file will be used (if present)."

C:\WINDOWS\RegisteredPackages
I delete the RegisteredPackages folder and its contents.

The RegisteredPackages folder contains installation files. They look like Windows Media Player 10 installation files.

C:\WINDOWS\SoftwareDistribution

Delete the contents of the "Download" subfolder.

Individual TEMP and Junk Files in C:\WINDOWS:

*.BAK Files
*.log Files
*.OLD Files
*.tmp Files
*.txt Files

----------------------

C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot and C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot2

The CatRoot folder contains security catalog files.

The CatRoot2 folder contains catalog database files.

I personally delete these matching-name subfolders and their contents in both the CatRoot and CatRoot2 folders:

{127D0A1D-4EF2-11D1-8608-00C04FC295EE}


C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot\{127D0A1D-4EF2-11D1-8608-00C04FC295EE} contains this file:

TimeStamp

C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot2\{127D0A1D-4EF2-11D1-8608-00C04FC295EE} contains these files:

catdb
TimeStamp

I delete all the Hotfix *.CAT files (KB*.* files). You'll be able to spot them by their assigned Hotfix numbers.

----------------------

C:\WINDOWS\system32\dllcache
I delete every file in the dllcache folder.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\LogFiles (See also Windows Driver Foundation - User-mode Driver Framework in PART 2.)

I delete the LogFiles folder and its contents, which consists of an empty WUDF subfolder. (WUDF stands for Windows Driver Foundation - User-mode Driver Framework, which is installed along with WMP11.)

Individual TEMP and Junk Files in C:\WINDOWS\system32:

*.BAK Files
*.log Files
*.OLD Files
*.tmp Files
*.txt Files

MRT.exe.........(Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool). Installed by Microsoft Update. Runs once when you reboot your system.

spmsg.dll.......(Service Pack Messages). Part of Microsoft package installer. The package installer is used to install software updates for Windows operating systems and other Microsoft products. The spmsg.dll records the events of a Windows software update to Event Viewer. Another of these files is created once you've installed a new update from the Microsoft Update Website. I usually just delete it again.

spupdsvc.exe....(Update RunOnce Service). Part of Microsoft package installer. The package installer is used to install software updates for Windows operating systems and other Microsoft products. The spupdsvc.exe is a service that runs after a reboot if a Windows software update requires processes to be executed after a reboot.

spupdsvc.inf....(ProcessesToRunAfterReboot). The spupdsvc.inf may show up in the system32 folder after downloading an update from the Microsoft Update Website. When the site has you restart your computer after installing an update, the spupdsvc.inf runs to complete the setup. It can be safely deleted once the reboot process is complete.

---------------------------------------

Cleaning Up After Driver Installations


Created By Intel Chipset Driver Installation

C:\Intel
I delete the Intel folder and its contents.

Contains Installation Log File.

C:\Program Files\Intel
I delete the Intel folder and its contents.

The Intel folder is installed by the Intel Chipset INF Update Utility. It contains a InfInst subfolder, which contains a license.txt, and an overview-of-the-product readme.txt.

Contains License Agreement and Readme Text.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRVSTORE
I delete the DRVSTORE folder and its contents.

Update installation files for Universal Serial Bus controllers.

The DRVSTORE folder contains two files in a numbered subfolder.

ich5id2.cat....Security Catalog Information File

ICH5ID2.INF....INF Update File for Intel® 82801 IDE device


NVIDIA Drivers Installation Files

C:\NVIDIA
I delete the NVIDIA folder and its contents.

Contains NVIDIA Drivers Installation files.


Created By REALTEK Fast Ethernet NIC Driver Installation

C:\Program Files\Realtek
I delete the Realtek folder and its contents.

Empty folder with one empty subfolder.

C:\WINDOWS\OPTIONS
I delete the OPTIONS folder and its contents.

Contains Installation Setup files



C:\WINDOWS\system32\ReinstallBackups

In the ReinstallBackups folder I will delete all backup subfolders and their files when I am certain, having given it a reasonable amount of time, I will be keeping all of my updated drivers.

I also delete the ReinstallBackups folder itself. It will be re-generated the next time I update some drivers.

---------------------------------------

Perfectly Safe To Remove Files and Folders


The only files that must be in the Root Directory for an NT-based operating system are: BOOT.INI, NTDETECT.COM and NTLDR.

Delete these zero-length files from the Root Directory (C:\):

AUTOEXEC.BAT
CONFIG.SYS
IO.SYS
MSDOS.SYS

----------------------

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch
Here you can delete any shortcuts you think you will never use in Quick Launch.

I delete the shortcuts I never use, then move the ones I keep to C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\Application Data\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch. It just keeps everything together. I keep the Quick Launch folder in case any programs I install look for it when they are installing their files.

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Microsoft\Media Index
I delete the Media Index folder.

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Microsoft\User Account Pictures\Default Pictures
Here you can delete any of the default avatars that you think you will probably never use on your Start Menu.

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Shared Documents (or Documents) (When you delete the desktop.ini file from Shared Documents the folder is renamed to simply Documents.)

I delete the My Music folder and its contents.

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Shared Documents (or Documents)\Shared Music
I delete the Shared Music folder and its contents.

The Shared Music folder contains these subfolders:

My Playlists

Sample Music

Sample Playlists

Sync Playlists

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Shared Documents (or Documents)\Shared Pictures
I delete the My Pictures folder and its contents.

----------------------

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\Application Data\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch
Here you can delete any shortcuts you think you will never use in Quick Launch.

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\My Documents\My eBooks
I delete the My eBooks folder.

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\My Documents\My Music
I delete the My Music folder and its contents.

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\My Documents\My Pictures
I delete the My Pictures folder and its contents.

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\My Documents\My Received Files
I delete the My Received Files folder.

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\My Documents\My Videos
I delete the My Videos folder.

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\SendTo
Here you can delete any "Send To" items (from the right-click context menu option) that you think you may never use, and even place here instead a few to your own liking.

----------------------

C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\Local Settings\Application Data

I delete the GDIPFONTCACHEV1.DAT.

The only thing I can say in with certainty about the GDIPFONTCACHEV1.DAT, is that it does not exist on a fresh Windows XP installation.

The GDIPFONTCACHEV1.DAT appears to be a fonts list of some kind. It could possibly be generated when opening an application. Or possibly, it could be dropped onto your computer when entering a Website that has pop-up advertising.

This may or may not be true...

The GDIPFONTCACHEV1.DAT is related to LinkGrabber 99.

LinkGrabber 99 is an adware program that serves unwanted commercial advertisements to user desktop using various pop-ups, web browser windows or additional toolbars.

Moreover, it is able to track user activity in the Internet, modify default browser settings and gather personal user information. It can be installed along with the ad-supported software or through some unsafe web sites. LinkGrabber 99 alters essential system settings so it could start on every Windows startup and remain active in background.

----------------------

C:\Program Files

C:\Program Files\ComPlus Applications
I delete the ComPlus Applications folder.

The ComPlus Applications folder contains files used by ComPlus applications. If there are no ComPlus applications installed on your XP machine, this folder will be empty. COM+ builds on the Microsoft Component Object Model (COM) integrated services and features, making it easier for developers to create and use software components in any language, using any tool.

C:\Program Files\microsoft frontpage
I delete the microsoft frontpage folder and its contents.

C:\Program Files\MSXML 4.0
I delete the MSXML 4.0 folder.

It is an empty folder on my system, installed by Microsoft Update MSXML 4.0 SP2 (KB936181).

C:\Program Files\Uninstall Information
I delete the Uninstall Information folder.

The Uninstall Information folder contains files and information for uninstall services. This folder is always empty on my system.

C:\Program Files\Windows Media Player\Skins
Here you can delete any Windows Media Player skins you think you will never use.

C:\Program Files\WindowsUpdate
I delete the WindowsUpdate folder.

This WindowsUpdate folder once belonged to Windows Update before SP2. Now it is no longer used by Windows Update. Instead Windows Update now uses C:\WINDOWS\SoftwareDistribution.

C:\Program Files\xerox
I delete the xerox folder and its contents.

The xerox folder contains all the files used by Xerox applications. By default this folder is empty.

C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Stationary
Here you can delete any stationary you think you will never use with your e-mails.

C:\Program Files\Common Files\Services
I delete Services folder and its contents.

----------------------

C:\WINDOWS

Individual Files in C:\WINDOWS:

Any *.bak Files

Any *.bmp Files

Any *.log Files

The "WindowsUpdate.log" can only be deleted if the Automatic Updates Service is stopped.

Any *.old Files

Any *.tmp Files

Any *.txt files

The "SchedLgU.Txt" can only be deleted if the Task Scheduler Service is stopped.

clock.avi
control.ini.....A zero-length file.

desktop.ini

win.ini.........(For 16-bit app support). XP just ignores it anyway.


C:\WINDOWS\addins
I delete the addins folder.

ActiveX controls (.ocx) files.

The addins folder is always empty on my system.

C:\WINDOWS\Config
I delete the Config folder.

The Config folder contains configuration .idf files used by the MIDI sound system. Depending on system configuration, this folder might be empty.

C:\WINDOWS\Connection Wizard
I delete the Connections Wizard folder.

The Connection Wizard folder contains files used for establishing Internet connectivity. It can be an empty folder.

C:\WINDOWS\Cursors
Here you can delete any cursors and animated cursors you think you will never use.

The Cursors folder contains static and animated cursor files. You can use these files by configuring the Mouse applet in the Control Panel.

C:\WINDOWS\Driver Cache\i386
I delete the drivers.cab and the sp2.cab

The Driver Cache folder contains a platform subdirectory and a copy of the driver.cab file so that new devices can be easily installed without needing the Windows XP CD. Might contain sp1.cab or sp2.cab if installing an integrated copy of the operating system (Slipstreamed CD).

Sometimes Windows Updates will replace earlier versions of files contained in these cabs with newer versions. Placing them in the i386 folder, not in the cabs themselves.

You're not going to have these newer versions of files on your Installation CD. For that reason, you may want to consider keeping these newer versions of individual files, and deleting only drivers.cab and sp2.cab


C:\WINDOWS\Help\Tours
I delete Tours folder and its contents.

Then I delete this file that belongs to it in C:\WINDOWS\system32:

tourstart.exe

----------------------

C:\WINDOWS\inf

The inf folder contains the .INF (system information) files used to install software components and hardware drivers.

Some people will tell you that it is okay to delete the entire contents of the inf folder. I totally disagree with this. INF files aren't just about installing software components or hardware drivers.

Just to be able to get into the Windows Component Wizard, your system will need these 36 .INF files present:

accessor.inf

certclas.inf
communic.inf
comnt5.inf

dtcnt5.inf

fp40ext.inf
fxsocm.inf

games.inf

ieaccess.inf
igames.inf
iis.inf
ims.inf

layout.inf

msmsgs.inf
msnmsn.inf
multimed.inf

netbeac.inf
netiprip.inf
netlpd.inf
netoc.inf
netsnmp.inf
nettpsmp.inf
netupnp.inf

oeaccess.inf
optional.inf

p2p.inf
pinball.inf

rootau.inf

setupqry.inf
startoc.inf
sysoc.inf

tsoc.inf

wbemoc.inf
wbemsnmp.inf
wmaccess.inf
wmpocm.inf


Here's an example using the Microsoft Update.

These .INF files are needed my Microsoft Update:

drvindex.inf

machine.inf

branches.inf.....<-- When you delete the branches.inf, another is created when you download and install a Windows Update.


Here's an example using the Acronis True Image program.

Acronis True Image needs these .INF files present in C:\WINDOWS\inf for you to utilize all its functions:

certclas.inf

disk.inf
drvindex.inf

layout.inf

volume.inf


And generally, updates for Windows Media Player require this file to be present:

unregmp2.exe.....Microsoft Windows Media Player Setup Utility


Here's what I do.

I delete all the .PNF files in the inf folder.

PNF files, are cache-type files that help making the opening of some applications quicker and more responsive.

These are files when deleted will re-create themselves should its corresponding .inf file by the same name be called upon.

Per Rob Elder: "It's a "pre-compiled" version of the ASCII .INF file that gets created when the Setup first processes a particular .INF file. It's done to speed up searches of the .INF files (as you've noticed there are LOTS of those on the system in Windows 2000/XP); if the dates of the .INF and .PNF files compare favorably (.PNF is later than .INF) the corresponding .PNF file will be used (if present)."

Then, after giving it some time (30 days or more), I see that no corresponding .PNF files are re-created alongside the .INF files of the same name, (That would mean my system isn't using those particular .INF files.), I will then go ahead and delete the unused .INF files.


In the meantime, however, here's a trick I picked up from NeoMayhem on our old Slimming Down Windows XP thread that we had going on at Neowin:

Do a search for mdm*.* and delete all the *.inf files that comes up.

There were 181 mdm*.* files in my inf folder.

These are all modem drivers, and it is very unlikely you will ever need them. You either have a modem already installed, or if you don't, and decide to add one later, it will come with its own set of drivers.

----------------------

C:\WINDOWS\Media
Here I delete most of the sounds Windows makes.

The Media folder contains .wav files used by XP. Like the sound you hear when Windows starts up, or when you empty your Recycle bin.

C:\WINDOWS\msapps
I delete the msapps folder and its contents.

Files that support backward compatibility in applications.

C:\WINDOWS\SoftwareDistribution

Contains Microsoft Updates installation source files and folders downloaded by Microsoft Update.

You can delete the SoftwareDistribution folder and its entire contents if you first stop the Automatic Updates Service. Upon your next visit to the Microsoft Update Website, the Automatic Updates Service will restart itself automatically, (assuming that you merely "stopped" the Service, and not "disabled" it), and the SoftwareDistribution folder and all its contents will be rebuilt.

Over a period of time, the "DataStore" and "Download" subfolders can build up with old source files and folders from previously installed Microsoft Updates, with log files reflecting your visits to the site, and with log files created by the Automatic Update Service.

Periodically, I like to delete the contents of the "DataStore" and "Download" subfolders...with the except of these two files from the "DataStore" subfolder: the edb.chk and the edb.log. If these two files are deleted, you will need to reboot your computer before your next visit to the Microsoft Update Website...otherwise, the Microsoft Update Website will not function. In addition, these two files can be deleted only after your system settles in from after rebooting, or after a time from a visit to the Microsoft Update Website...while the Automatic Updates Service is running, that is.

C:\WINDOWS\Temp
I delete any files I ever find in the Temp folder.

Note: It's a good idea to delete these files after a reboot. Some programs you install may use temporary installation files they place here to complete their installation upon the rebooting.

Additional Note: Windows Genuine Advantage installs the WGAErrLog.txt to the Temp folder. Should you delete this file, be sure to reboot your system, so that a new WGAErrLog.txt can be created. Otherwise, Microsoft Update may not work for you.

C:\WINDOWS\Web\Wallpaper
Here you can delete any the Windows Desktop Wallpaper you think you will never use.

----------------------

C:\WINDOWS\system32

Windows Screen Savers

I delete these files from C:\WINDOWS\system32:

logon.scr.......Logon Screen Saver
scrnsave.scr....Default Screen Saver
ss3dfo.scr......Direct3D Flying Objects Screen Saver
ssbezier.scr....Bezier Curves Screen Saver
ssflwbox.scr....Direct3D Flowerbox Screen Saver
ssmarque.scr....Marquee Screen Saver
ssmypics.scr....My Pictures Slideshow Screensaver
ssmyst.scr......Mystify Screen Saver
sspipes.scr.....Direct3D Pipes Screen Saver
ssstars.scr.....Starfield Screen Saver
sstext3d.scr....Direct3D 3D Text Screen Saver

C:\WINDOWS\system32\3com_dmi
I delete the 3com_dmi folder.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\1025, 1028, 1031, 1033, 1037, 1041, 1053, 2052 & 3076
I delete all the empty number folders except 1033 (The English Language). Folder number 1033 isn't empty.

These numbered folders contain localization languages files. Most of these folders will be empty. The English language is 1033.

Per Microsoft: Localization (language) files for a specific language, corresponding to the number assigned to this folder. This folder remains empty unless Windows XP Professional is localized for this particular language.

Keeping the dwintl.dll in C:\WINDOWS\system32\1033 is really more of an old habit for me than anything else.

Back when, on the old TweakXP site, Dirk Diggler, psychogeek (then VidPro) and I would mess around deleting files and folders from Windows XP. We would have contests to see who could delete the most files and still reboot their systems. (Fun times.) For some reason, the three of us would always leave alone the dwintl.dll in C:\WINDOWS\system32\1033.

Some people report that they do also delete this particular file and its folder along with all the other empty numbered folders.

You can try deleting them yourself to see how it works out for you. Saving files and folders you remove another location for a time is always a practice...just until you're sure.

---------------------------------------

C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot and C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot2

The CatRoot folder contains security catalog files.

The CatRoot2 folder contains catalog database files.

You might be able to delete both the CatRoot and CatRoot2 folders and their contents. It really depends on your system.

Some people can delete all their .CAT files and experience absolutely no problems whatsoever. Others can't. Why this difference? I really can't say. It could be because of different third-party drivers, or programs installed on a system. Many times the difference of what can and cannot be deleted is dependent upon which Services are running on a given system.

On my system, Acronis True Image's Explore Drive function is dependent upon these two .CAT files:

NT5.CAT
NT5INF.CAT

I can remove all other .CAT files from the folder with these two exceptions and Acronis's Explore Drive function works perfectly.

If these .CAT files are not present, a Windows Hardware Installation window will come up, telling me, "The software you are installing for hardware: Generic volume has not passed Windows Logo testing to verify its compatibility with Windows XP...and so on."

If I choose to continue the installation an error message from Acronis will popup, saying, "Cannot assign drive letter to a partition from the image archive."

Some third-party programs you have installed may also be dependent upon the presence of certain .CAT files.

When certain .CAT files a particular system needs are not present, errors are reported to the "dberr.txt", which is created in the C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot2 folder.

At various times I've spied .CAT file errors in the dberr.txt relating to some of these .CAT files: FP4.CAT, IMS.CAT, MSMSGS.CAT, msn7.cat, msn9.cat, MSTSWEB.CAT, NTPRINT.CAT, SP2.CAT, startoc.cat and wmerrenu.cat.

A good practice if you are uncertain about which .CAT files to remove:

Keep all the original .CAT Files that are installed during a Windows XP Installation. My installation happens to be with an SP2 slipstreamed CD, so yours may not have SP2.CAT, and possibly a couple of others if you installed from the original Windows XP CD...at least until you've updated to SP2.

FP4.CAT

HPCRDP.CAT

IASNT4.CAT
IMS.CAT

MAPIMIG.CAT
MSMSGS.CAT
msn7.cat
msn9.cat
MSTSWEB.CAT
MW770.CAT

NT5.CAT
NT5IIS.CAT
NT5INF.CAT
NTPRINT.CAT

OEMBIOS.CAT

SP2.CAT
startoc.cat

TimeStamp

wmerrenu.cat

Keep this .CAT file created by Windows Genuine Advantage:

WgaNotify.cat

And keep any .CAT files created by third-party drivers, or programs you've installed.

It's okay to delete all the Hotfix .CAT files (KB*.* files). You'll be able to spot them by their assigned Hotfix numbers.

You can also delete all the .CAT Files installed by WMP10:

codecs10.CAT

DRM10.CAT

MPCD10.CAT
MPPRE10.CAT
MPSTUB10.CAT

WMDM10.CAT
WMFSDK10.CAT
WMP10.CAT
WMSET10.CAT
WPD10.CAT

I personally delete these matching-name subfolders and their contents in both the CatRoot and CatRoot2 folders:

{127D0A1D-4EF2-11D1-8608-00C04FC295EE}


C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot\{127D0A1D-4EF2-11D1-8608-00C04FC295EE} contains this file:

TimeStamp

C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot2\{127D0A1D-4EF2-11D1-8608-00C04FC295EE} contains these files:

catdb

TimeStamp

For the CatRoot2 folder, I will configure my TEMP and Junk File Cleaner to delete all the individual TEMP Files (not the folders) that return there fairly often. All the files created and re-created in the CatRoot2 folder are TEMP Files. They have *.chk, *. emb, *log, and *.txt extensions.

Here's something you can do if you like.

Place the all the .CAT files in a separate folder for a time. Periodically check the "dberr.txt" in C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot2. See if any errors show up pointing to missing .CAT files. Then put those .CAT files back into C:\WINDOWS\system32\CatRoot\{F750E6C3-38EE-11D1-85E5-00C04FC295EE}

When you have all the proper .CAT files in place, errors in the dberr.txt will stop showing up.

The dberr.txt is a log file for catalog file registrations. Contains information about catalog files that are not registered, and exists only if any non-registered catalogs are identified. The dberr.txt is also created if catalog files are missing.
---------------------------------------

C:\WINDOWS\system32\dhcp
I delete the dhcp folder.

The dhcp folder is an empty folder used to hold Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) database files if the host becomes a DHCP server.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\DirectX\Dinput
I delete the Dinput Folder and its contents.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\dllcache
I delete every file in the dllcache folder.

The dllcache folder contains backup copies of the operating system files that are under the Windows File System Protection system.

Windows Updates will sometimes replace earlier versions of files contained in the dllcache folder with newer versions.

Keep in mind, you are not going to have these newer versions of files on your Installation CD. For that reason, you may want to consider keeping these newer versions of individual files, and deleting only the original files placed in the dllcache by your Installation CD.

Myself I delete the dllcache files, because loosing 2,258 files which take up 415MB of space, allows PerfectDisk to run through its defragmentation process much more quickly, and also allows Acronis True Image to make backup images and restores much more quickly.

So to me it's worth it. It may not be to you. So think it over.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\export
I delete the export folder.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\inetsrv
I delete the inetsrv folder.

The inetsrv folder contains files used by the World Wide Web service. This folder is empty.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\oobe
I delete the oobe folder and its contents.

OOBE is Contains "Out of Box Experience" files that prompt users to complete product activation and registration and to create a new user other than Administrator. This feature is activated only after setup.

I'm told if you have a Retail (or OEM version) of XP, and you think you might at some point need to reactivate, you shouldn't delete the oobe folder and its contents. But that's what I am told. I couldn't tell you for sure, since I personally don't have an OEM version of XP.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\ShellExt
I delete the ShellExt folder.

By default the ShellExt folder is empty.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\SoftwareDistribution
I delete the SoftwareDistribution folder and its contents.

Microsoft Update installs its software onto your system using this folder.

Actual Windows Updates are installed onto your system utilizing the SoftwareDistribution folder in C:\WINDOWS.

It is safe to remove the SoftwareDistribution folder and its contents from C:\WINDOWS\system32, because when there is an update for the Micorsoft Update software, the folder will be recreated.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\wins
I delete the wins folder.

The wins folder contains files to support the Windows Internet Name Service (WINS). The wins folder is empty.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\xircom
I delete the xircom folder.


A Few Fairly Useless system32 Files

LNKSTUB.EXE.....(Win95-to-WinNT Migration Dll, Win95 Side). Incompatibility program. This program was designed for Windows Millennium and previous versions.

jet500.dll......(JET Engine DLL). The Microsoft Jet (Joint Engine Technology) Database Engine is a database engine on which several Microsoft products were built. It has since been superseded by Microsoft Desktop Engine or Microsoft SQL Server Desktop Engine (MSDE) and no longer exists as a component of Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC).

mplay32.exe.....(Windows Media Player 5.1). A very old and basic version of Media Player.

---------------------------------

MSXML 2.6 is an early version of MSXML, and is represented by msxml2.dll. This product is no longer supported by Microsoft, and the CLSIDs and ProgIDs it exposes have been subsumed by MSXML 3.0.

MSXML 2.5 is an early version of MSXML, and is represented by msxml.dll. This product is no longer supported by Microsoft, and the CLSIDs and ProgIDs it exposes have been subsumed by MSXML 3.0.

It's okay to delete these four system32 files. They're useless.

msxml.dll - release version of the MSXML parser: 1.0 thru 2.5 SP3
msxmlr.dll - resource-only dll for 2.5 SP2 thru 2.5 SP3

msxml2.dll - release version of the MSXML parser: 2.6 thru 2.6 SP2
msxml2r.dll - resource-only dll for 2.6 SP1 thru 2.6 SP2

---------------------------------

REGEDT32.EXE....(Registry Editor Utility). A 32-bit Registry-editing tool that can set security permissions on Registry keys and values. In Windows XP the extra functionality of the Regedt32.exe has been merged into the Regedit.exe. The Regedt32.exe now is nothing more than a link. If you start the Regedt32.exe, the system runs the Regedit.exe (Registry Editor).

ROUTEMON.EXE....(Router Console Monitor). A utility that is no longer supported. When you run the ROUTEMON command in the Command Prompt, you are told to use the NETSH command instead.

SETUP.EXE.......(Windows NT Setup Executable). The Windows Setup tool. The SETUP.EXE runs automatically when you insert the installation disc in your CD drive. A copy of it is dropped onto the hardrive during the installation process. Removing it means nothing, because it's still on your installation Disc.

WINMSD.EXE.....(Windows XP Diagnostics or System Information). Clicking on the Winmsd.exe, you can alternatively start the System Information Utility, the Msinfo32.exe, which is located in the Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\MSInfo folder. You can run the Msinfo32.exe without the Winmsd.exe, but you cannot run the Winmsd.exe without the Msinfo32.exe. The Msinfo32.exe is actually an updated version of the Winmsd.exe.

winntbbu.dll...(Windows Setup Billboard DLL). The "Setup will complete in approximately: 34 minutes" progress screen you see during Windows installation.

WPABALN.EXE....(Windows Windows Product Activation (WPA) Balloon Reminder). If you've already activated your copy of Windows, why keep this file?

WRITE.EXE......(Windows Write). A text and rich-text document-editing tool. When upgrading from a previous version of Windows to Win95, (Man, is this file dated.) WRITE.EXE is replaced with an executable that simply launches WordPad.


IPB
 
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Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 28th July 2014 - 02:21 PM